The Maurice K. Shaw Navigation Classroom

The Maurice K. Shaw Navigation Classroom

Education Programs

Kate’s Home in the Harbor

Students will step back in time and meet Kate Walker, keeper of Robbins Reef Lighthouse from 1890-1919. Through the use of art, maps, and artifacts Kate teaches about the history and function of lighthouses, and guides a tour of the museum’s newest exhibition, Robbins Reef Lighthouse: A Home in the Harbor. After the tour, students will make a pop-up book featuring the lighthouse; with tugboats, ships, and the New York Harbor skyline in the background.

Grades 2-8 $5 per student, $75 minimum

Annie’s Journey to America

Join Annie Moore from Ireland as she disembarks an immigrant steamship and tells her story of coming to America through music, art, and Irish step dancing. Annie addresses all immigrant groups in this program, which encourages students to explore their family history and traditions. The class will enjoy discussing the customs of different cultures, including the costumes, food, musical instruments, and memories that make each immigrant group unique.

Grades 2–5
$5 per student, $75 minimum

Young Jack’s Voyage

Children pretend to board a sailing vessel with Jack, a nineteenth century sea captain who orders them to coil riggings, examine the parts of a ship, and sing sea shanties. Jack uses drama and music to teach students how to steer the ship, keep lookout with a spyglass, and work in the galley. The young sailors act out the characters of Jack’s family and crew, and draw a picture of their adventures to bring home.

Grades Kindergarten–2
$5 per student, $75 minimum

Lady Liberty

The Statue of Liberty comes to life on her pedestal to teach the history of New York Harbor. Students explore the adventures of the Lenepe tribes, Giovanni Verrazano, Henry Hudson, and Robert Fulton through storytelling and reenactment. They create a timeline with details of important dates in our City’s history including the settlement of the Dutch, the invasion of the British, and the Revolutionary War. The class will also learn about the different types of ships that have sailed through the Harbor in the past 700 years.

Grades 3–6
$5 per student, $75 minimum



Seas, Stars, and Spyglasses

Students work with the tools that ancient mariners used to find their way across the sea, and they compare those techniques and instruments to the ones used today. After looking at the night sky and the constellations in our classroom planetarium, they will make a mariner’s quadrant and chart their course on a “voyage” across the Atlantic.

Grades 4–12
$5 per student, $75 minimum


After a tour of John A. Noble’s Houseboat Studio, the class will write a story, sketch ship models, and design a maritime scene using paint on an acrylic printmaking plate. Students complete the project on our etcher’s press, where they create monoprints to bring home. An educator will discuss Noble’s work with the students and explore examples of the mediums he worked with including lithography, oil painting, and photography.

Grades 4–12
$8 per student, $100 minimum

Watercolor Painting

Students discover the serenity of watercolor art as they experiment with the techniques of wet on wet, wet on dry, and color washing. They will discuss art history and look at inspiring works by Winslow Homer. An educator will tell a sensory story about life on a ship, and encourage the class to write a maritime tale of their own. Students will explore our education facilities and learn museum etiquette such as art analysis and label reading.

Grades 2–12
$8 per student, $100 minimum

Our programs align with:
• Common Core Learning Standards in English Language Arts: Writing Standards, Reading Standards, and
History/Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects.
• Blueprint for the Arts: Art Making, Literacy in the Arts, Making Connections, Community and Cultural
Resources, Careers and Lifelong Learning
• We adapt each program for Special Education based on Universal Design for Learning (UDL) standards.

The Noble Maritime Collection's education department is generously supported, in part, by the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with Council Member Debi Rose and the City Council; the New York State Council on the Arts, with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature; Staten Island Foundation; and the Northfield Bank Foundation.